Highlight of the day. A visit with Neal and Peggy Woody, who came by the studio to get a couple pots. I first met Neal and Peggy 10 years ago, because they had some clay that was causing a drainage problem in one of their tobacco fields. What started as some college kids digging holes with shovels grew into the ultimate excavation and extraction of 22 dump trucks of clay out of the Turkey Creek field for me and my friends to use. That clay, referred to as ‘pipe clay’ in the regional vernacular for its historical use in making tobacco pipes, changed the course of my life, formed the foundation that my current body of work is still based on, and created an unexpected friendship between me and the Woodys. Neal has never asked me for any money for the clay, instead preferring to get a few pots made from ‘that old dirt’ every once in a while. When I first started talking to Neal about doing a big dig, I asked with what I would need to do for him and he told me to “just leave my field in better shape than I found it and we’ll be alright” because as he saw it “as it sits in that field, the old dirt ain’t worth nothing to me, it’s what ya’ll do with it that gives it value”. That sentiment remains one of the most powerful ideas in the world to me. It still amazes me that something that was a problem, dirt that “won’t grow much good of nothing” would end up growing all of this. #thewoodys #wildclay #localclay #thatolddirt #ceramics #local #joshcopus

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I can say a lot of things about using wild clays in my work and talk forever about the philosophy behind a place based making methodology but at the heart of it all is one simple truth. I believe that if I’m excited about what I’m doing and approach my pursuits in life and work with enthusiasm then I have the best chance to be successful in those pursuits. As this photo illustrates, I get really excited about clays straight from the ground. I believe this enthusiasm transfers to the work I make. #enthusiasm #wildclay #joshcopus #ceramics

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#Repost from @johnstongentithesstudios If your into wild clays check them out. Fred is onto some cool stuff. A true brother in clay. 
Josh Copus testing plasticity of the Why Not Clay . Local history suggests this clay has been used Since 1912 . I found a broken piece of Native American pottery up the hill from this spot it was made from red clay which is also on the property . The red clay was formed from decomposed granite .This clay is white and is formed from volcanic deposits . #geological #geology #wildclays #wildclay #nativeclays #nature #contemporaryceramics #internationalceramics #northcarolinapotters #northcarolinapottery #Sesgrovepottery #FredJohnstonPottery #JoshCopuspottery

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Finally got the two tons of clay out of the truck. It certainly was easier going in with the loader machine than it was coming out with the shovel. This is the beginnings of my clay storage bin system. Like many things in my life and on my land project, it’s still very much a work in progress. The vision certainly is grand. Someday it will all be under a shed and everything I need to process and use the wild clays will be right next to it. Someday. Without delusions of grandeur there would be no grandeur. #claystorage #wildclay #landproject #grandvisions #delusionsofgrandeur

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This was one of the truly special moments of my recent wild clay adventure tour of North Carolina. Standing around the old truck, talking about the exciting potential of all these new materials with Mark Hewitt, Takuro Shibata, Bill Jones, and Michael Hunt. Hewitt, of course is a legend, especially around these parts. Takuro is the owner of Starworks Ceramics, a great company that is specializing in moist clay bodies made with NC wild clays. Bill Jones is one of the important young voices in the state and just finished up working with Daniel and Kate Johnston. And Michael Hunt is my number one clay geek out, brother in clay hunting partner. I always feel blessed to be a part of it all. It never fails to amaze me how this dirt brings us together. @bandanapottery #brothersinclay #wildclay #wildclaygeekout #apotterslife #ceramics

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A portrait of Michael Hunt of @bandanapottery at the brick factory. Michael has been such an influential person in my life and career, a true brother in clay, friend, teacher, and peer. He helped to support and promote my earliest interests and forays into the world of wild clays and local materials. It was a full circle moment to be able to take him to this place, and in some way return the favor, pay it forward, and share the wealth. #michaelhunt #brothersinclay #payitforward #wildclay #wildclaygeekout #apotterslife

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